Interviews

FLOWERS AFTER A PUNCH IN THE FACE

MediaPost solicited my opinion along with a panel of industry experts about the recent changes to Facebook’s news feed that prioritizes local news in the content feed.

“While on the surface, this is good news for local news, it feels a bit like flowers after being punched in the face. Let’s not forget that Facebook just cut publisher’s organic reach to zero. Also, this change is more about Facebook trying to show users healthy content than it is about helping publishers. I think we can agree that local news is better than clickbait, but it still causes discomfort that Facebook is the arbiter of what’s good and bad for us.”

Read the full article on Media Post:

As Facebook Prioritizes Local News, Industry Experts Respond

SABOTAGE?

Apple is blocking/deleting 3rd party cookies for Safari users in some situations. This hurts advertisers since their targeted (and especially retargeted) ads are less effective. But in particular, it hurts the ad tech providers that act as the middle men between advertisers and publishers – their entire value proposition is based on the ability to track and target consumers across the Internet.

I was quoted in this article on Axios:

Advertisers slam Apple for “sabotage”

This could be a good thing for publishers if it motivates advertisers to buy ad inventory directly, which is far more lucrative to publishers than programmatic. It could also force ad tech providers to pass through more of the revenue to publishers, since they are providing less of the value realized by advertisers.

THEY GIVETH, THEN THEY PUNCHETH YOU IN THE FACE

I was interviewed by Erik Sass at MediaPost about publisher strategy in the sometimes adversarial relationship between publishers and platforms. I love his opening line: “The platforms giveth, then they puncheth you in the face.”

Facebook, Google Squeezing Publishers Again

Publishers casting about for alternative ways to reach (and take possession) of their audiences are giving another look to older channels like email, according to Keith Sibson, vice-president of product and marketing at email platform PostUp. He noted publishers can also benefit from growing concern among advertisers about brand safety on the platforms.

“It’s a good opportunity for publishers to try to rekindle the direct relationship with advertisers and audiences.  Publishers themselves have become reliant on those very same platforms as traffic sources … One good way to hedge the risk centers around building a direct relationship with your audience is through channels like email. We’re not telling anyone to quit Facebook, Google, but don’t let it become their primary business,” said Sibson.

When it comes to audience-building strategies, Sibson said PostUp clients have had success converting traffic referred by the platforms into subscribers: “Of course, they do programmatic like everyone else, they get traffic from Google and Facebook like everyone else, but they view them as an opportunity to convert temporary short-term traffic into a long-term relationship.”

Marketing Strategy Interview

I was interviewed by Martech Advisor in what started as a bio piece for me and PostUp, and turned into a discussion of marketing strategy.

Interview with Keith Sibson, VP Product and Marketing at PostUp

Could you share for our readers, an infographic or description depicting your marketing stack (various marketing software products or platforms your team uses or subscribes to)?

The technology is interesting, but not as interesting as the clear business model it enables and is built around. As an email marketer, if a given initiative does not clearly map to one or more of the levels in the email revenue funnel, then you are wasting your time. Also, initiatives closer to the top of the funnel are more impactful, because they “cascade” down the funnel. It’s easier to achieve a 10 percent increase in list size than a 10 percent increase in the click-through-rate.